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F-abric – The fiber content includes hemp and flax from Holland, Belgium and France, as well as modal made from Austrian beech trees. The fabric content, as well as a special weaving process, speeds up the fabric’s decomposition, and is 100% biodegradable. (read more about f-abric)


Faille – A glossy, soft, finely-ribbed silk-like woven fabric made from cotton, silk, or manufactured fibers

Faux Fur – A slang term for pile fabrics and garments that imitate animal pelts. The most popular fake furs are probably those made from modacrylic fiber.

Faux Leather – A term used for imitation leathers. More cor­rectly, these should be described by their actual construction, such as vinyl-coated fabric.

Faux Suede – A fabric with a short nap and a soft finish that suggests animal suede.

Felt – A non-woven fabric made from wool, hair, or fur, and sometimes in combination with certain manufactured fibers, where the fibers are locked together in a process utilizing heat, moisture, and pressure to form a compact material.

Fishnet – Fishnet is an open, diamond shaped knit fabric.

Flannel – A medium-weight, plain or twill weave fabric that is typically made from cotton, a cotton blend, or wool. The fabric has a very soft hand, brushed on both sides to lift the fiber ends out of the base fabric and create a soft, fuzzy surface. End-uses include shirts and pajamas.

Flannelette – A medium-weight, plain weave fabric with a soft hand, usually made from cotton. The fabric is usually brushed only on one side, and is lighter weight than flannel. End-uses include shirts and pajamas.

Fleece – A lightweight fabric with a thick, heavy fleece-like surface. It may be a pile or napped fabric, and either woven or knit construction. End uses include coats, jackets, blankets, etc. Fleece fabrics are available in a variety of constuctions: Polarfleece® is the original fleece fabric, developed in 1979, by Malden Mills. It is typically used for non-technical garments, and it is only available at Malden Mills®; Polartec®, also developed by Malden Mills, was created for today’s high-performance technical garments, which provides enhanced durability warmth, wind resistance, breathability and weather protection.

Flocked– A type of raised decoration applied to the surface of a fabric in which an adhesive is printed on the fabric in a specific pattern, and then finely chopped fibers are applied by means of dusting, air-brushing, or electrostatic charges. The fibers adhere only to the areas where the adhesive has been applied, and the excess fibers are removed by mechanical means.

Foil – Foil is a high gloss mylar usually in metallic colors that pulls away from the clear backing. Sometimes it is referred to as foil paper and other times it is referred to as foil sheets. The foil is applied to the fabric using very high heat.

Foulard – A lightweight twill-weave fabric, made from filament yarns like silk, acetate, polyester, with a small all-over print pattern on a solid background. The fabric is often used in men’s ties.

Four-Ply Crepe – Four ply crepe is a heavier version of regular crepe made with four ply yarn. A four ply yarn is made from twisting together four individual yarn strands. The resulting fabric is medium to heavy weight, smooth and flat, with a crepe finish and a good deal of lustre. The fabric tailors and drapes beautifully and is a favorite for bridal usage. 4 ply silks are most frequently used for bridal gowns, semi fitted garments, dresses and suits. Fabric sews easily, but shows pin holes and ravels fairly easily.

Four-Way Stretch – A fabric that stretches both on the crosswise and lengthwise grains of the fabric. It is the same as two-way stretch.

French Terry – A knit jersey with loops on one side. Sometimes napped to make fleece.